The designation, unfortunately for the study group, doesn’t come with any funds attached, but committee member Barbara Kiley is hopeful that the “endangered” tag will help them achieve their goal of saving the building.

“It’s a wake up call for the people of the community to protect the building,” she said.news-tarkilnsign

Kiley said she has been applying for the designation for the past few years. However, Tarkiln was always rejected because Preservation Massachusetts felt the building could have been saved with money from the town.

“They felt the town should be paying Community Preservation Commission money and then it wouldn’t be endangered,” Kiley said.

However, once a $1.3 million plan to restore the building was shot down at Town Meeting this spring, the Tarkiln’s outlook changed.

A release from Preservation Massachusetts states the building was closed in 2006 “due to maintenance issues and considerable neglect.” It also says there is a chance the building may be demolished if stability issues are not addressed.

“So many historic schools across Massachusetts have been lost,” said Preservation Massachusetts President Jim Igoe. “There is a fantastic opportunity to preserve and reuse this historic gem for the benefit of all Duxbury.”

The Tarkiln group made their pitch to Duxbury’s Community Preservation Committee last Thursday morning. Community Preservation funds are split into several “buckets.” There is a general fund (which is depleted in Duxbury for this year,) historic preservation, land use and recreation and affordable housing. The only other project competing for historic preservation funds would be the effort to restore the World War I memorial. Kiley said they are only looking, at this time, for money to “button up” the building.

The CPC is hearing from various groups around town but won’t make any kind of decision until after a public hearing sometime in November.

The Tarkiln is one of five sites on the endangered sites list. The others are Cliftex Mill of New Bedford, Paul Revere and Sons Copper Rolling Mill in Canton, Ames Shovel Complex in Easton.