The following is an explanation of each warrant article including details not found in the warrant, such as specific dollar amounts where applicable. We have listed recommendations on specific articles by town boards where available. Town committees and boards were still in the process of voting on various town meeting articles when this supplement went to press. Therefore, the list of committees that voted to support or not support particular articles is not complete. The following is an explanation of each warrant article including details not found in the warrant, such as specific dollar amounts where applicable. We have listed recommendations on specific articles by town boards where available. Town committees and boards were still in the process of voting on various town meeting articles when this supplement went to press. Therefore, the list of committees that voted to support or not support particular articles is not complete.

• Article 1 is an annual article appointing non-elected officials. These include various committees appointed by the town moderator, the selectmen and the town manager. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 2 is an annual article that allows the reading of reports by town officers and town committees and the acceptance of the annual town report. It is expected that the pool study committee will deliver a report and that a proclamation will be read regarding the First Parish Church. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• ARTICLE 3 is a routine article that sets the compensation of the following elected town officials: assessors, selectmen, town meeting moderator, and town clerk. The total amount requested is $72,040, the same as last year. The majority of this amount is the town clerk's proposed salary for FY08 of $62,000, which is the same as FY07. Annual salaries for selectmen and assessors are $1,500 for board members and $2,000 for chairmen. The town moderator's salary is $40. None of these have increased for years. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 4 is the acceptance of state highway funding, or Chapter 90 money. This annual article authorizes selectmen to temporarily borrow money for highway maintenance and then accept the state reimbursement for this expense. The amount of state aid is expected to be $329,051, a $4,500 increase over last year. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 5 is the FY08 operating budget for the town and schools totaling $54.6 million, a 3.8 percent increase over the current FY07 budget. This amount includes the operating and capital budget as well as the water department budget. Notable expenses include $1.8 million for general government (a 1.6 percent increase from FY07); $25.5 million for education, (2.8 percent increase); $5.7 million for public safety, (3.1 percent increase); $3.6 million for department of public works, (3.7 percent increase); $1.5 million for library and recreation, (1.4 percent increase); $451,210 for health and human services, (3 percent increase); $1.5 million for the water department, (3.9 percent increase); $13.5 million for town and school shared costs including employee benefits, insurance and debt service, (6.1 percent increase). Revenues come from these sources: $38.5 million from the town's property tax levy (3.7 percent increase); $4.8 million in state revenue (6.7 percent increase); $8.1 million in local receipts (1.2 percent increase); and $180,767 in available funds. This year, $1,596,443 in free cash is being used to balance the budget. Supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 6 is the FY08 capital budget totaling $3.61 million. The majority of this amount - $3.15 million- will be borrowed to construct the new Birch Street water tank. The other capital expenses include: $25,000 for portable radios for the fire department; $10,500 to overhaul Marine Unit 1 for the harbormaster's department; $20,000 to replace the old town hall's heating/AC system; $32,000 for a new DPW 3/4 ton pick-up truck; $48,000 for a new cemetery rack truck; $30,000 to reline the crematory retorts, or ovens; and $45,000 to add to the cemetery columbarium, a place to store cremated ashes. Three capital items that will be funded from water enterprise account include $150,00 for water system rehabilitation; $100,000 for PCE pipe replacement; and $32,000 to replace a 3/4 ton 4x4 pick-up truck. The school department's proposed capital item of $600,000 for technology is not included in this budget. Supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 7 is the Duxbury Personnel Plan and Compensation Schedule, a routine article used to give raises to town managers and non-school and non-union town employees as well as part-time or temporary workers. Of the $105,000 in this article, $3,000 is earmarked for tuition reimbursement. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 8 is an annual article for funding collective bargaining agreements from any of the nine unions in town, including police, firefighters, teachers, and school and government employees. It may be indefinitely postponed as there are no union contracts currently ready to be voted under this article.

• Article 9 requests $400,000 for the annual lease of Duxbury Beach from its owner, the non-profit, Duxbury Beach Reservation, Inc. This amount is the same as last year. The lease pays for beach management costs, which have been increasing in past years due to the storm damage repairs and the expanded endangered species protection program including monitors for piping plovers. The town has been leasing the beach since 1919. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 10 is an annual article asking voters to appropriate $10,000 for the July 4th parade and ceremony. This money is supplemented by the Fourth of July committee's fundraising efforts. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 11 is a request from the Conservation Commission to add $5,500 to the conservation fund. The total amount last year was $11,000. In the past, the Conservation Commission used the fund to purchase small pieces of land, but now the fund pays for the costs of managing 2,300 acres of conservation land and 750 acres of town land. It funds the upkeep to trails, access ways, parking lots, fences, gates, locks, and signs. The fund is also used for surveying parcels, finding old boundaries and installing new ones to protect from abutter encroachment. Certain types of land such as the town's hayfields, cranberry bogs and other wetlands require special care. The conservation fund also meets special wildlife management issues, such as building and maintaining platforms for osprey nests and boxes for wood ducks and swallows. Protecting endangered species and eradicating invasive plant species are also covered by the fund. In the past, this money has been used to hire summer interns who perform a variety of tasks like cutting back trails to building boardwalks over wetlands. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.



• Article 12 seeks voter approval to adopt a state law that creates a property tax-break program for senior citizens. The state tax-relief program would replace the local one run by the Council on Aging since 1996. The state program allows a $750 tax break for up to 10 seniors aged 65 and older. There are no income requirements. Under the town's current program, a senior citizen must be over 60 and be a resident homeowner in Duxbury. They are allowed to reduce their taxes by $500 a year by volunteering in various town departments. Over the last 10 years, 81 seniors have taken advantage of this program. The state program allows for streamlined bookkeeping, as its tax break comes directly as a tax abatement on a senior's third quarter tax bill. With the town's program, seniors are given a paycheck, which they must then turn over to the town to pay a portion of their taxes. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 13 proposes to reauthorize three revolving funds for three town departments: the Council on Aging, the Conservation Commission and the Assessing Department. Revolving funds are accounts that are set up to take in fees for services that are then paid out for expenses incurred to offer the services. The Council on Aging revolving fund can hold up to $70,000 generated from fees for senior center programs. The money in this account is used to pay instructors or to buy supplies. Last year, the fund's total was $50,000. The Conservation Commission's revolving fund for $15,000 will contain money generated from the sale of Christmas trees on the town-owned West Street (Jaycox) Christmas tree farm. This money will be used to pay a forester to spray and shear the trees and mow the property at a cost of approximately $10,000. The Geographic Information System (GIS) revolving fund would hold a maximum of $40,000. Duxbury's GIS is a computer-based system used for the creation and maintenance of the town's geographic features, infrastructure data and other related land-based information. The GIS revolving fund holds fees paid by users who request certain electronic data and/or plans from the town's GIS system. This money provides a dedicated revenue source to upgrade and maintain the GIS system. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 14 requests $80,000 in Community Preservation Act funds for the Community Preservation Committee's operating budget. This is the same amount as last year. This account pays for the board's administrator and consultants, as well as engineering fees and legal costs. Any unused money will be returned to the CPC general account. Supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 15 proposes to allocate 10 percent of the Community Preservation Act tax surcharge to accounts for each of its three purposes: open space, historical preservation and affordable housing. This year's allocation will be $216,000 for each account. Last year, the amount was $203,844. Duxbury residents pay a three percent surcharge on their real estate taxes to fund projects recommended by the Community Preservation Committee and approved by town meeting. For the past four years, the state has matched the town's funds by 100 percent. Supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 16 seeks $500,000 in Community Preservation Act funds for drainage improvements and site work related to construction of two synthetic turf fields at the middle and high schools. A citizen's group called P.R.I.D.E., which stands for promoting recreation investment to develop excellence, is trying to raise $3 million to replace the middle and high school grass football fields with artificial turf fields and also construct a new track and improve lighting at DHS. The group will raise funds for the remaining cost of the project.

• Article 17 seeks $125,000 in Community Preservation Act funds to prepare construction and bid documents for the restoration of the historical Tarkiln Community Center on Summer Street (Route 53). Town meeting approved almost $35,000 in CPA funds in 2004 to pay for an architect to evaluate the former schoolhouse turned community center. Tarkiln consists of two one-room schoolhouses built in 1871 and 1908 respectively, with a connector housing bathrooms and a basement that dates to 1926. The article is jointly sponsored by the Historical Commission and the Community Preservation Committee. Supported by board of selectmen and community preservation committee.

• Article 18 requests a transfer of money from the Community Preservation Fund to the Water Enterprise Fund. Last year, Community Preservation Act money was used to purchase the Delano property. A portion of this property will be used by the Water Department for a potential well site. Funds from the Water Enterprise Fund were used to reimburse the CPC for the full amount of the property, instead of just the well site portion. This article would now reimburse the Water Enterprise Fund for overpaying on the Delano property.

• Article 19 seeks permission to allow the town accountant to transfer any funds left over from finished Community Preservation Act projects back into the CPA fund. Money from six projects totaling $17,221.88 will be put back into the fund. This includes $3,601.75 for the King Caesar House; $1,432.49 for the Keene Street Field; $2,851 and $7,826 from the Jaycox Tree Farm; $803.84 for the Bluefish River Fire House, and $706.80 for the Town Green Irrigation. Supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 20 seeks to trade 1.65 acres of water department land off Franklin Street near Jeremiah Drive for 16,150 square feet of conservation land on Birch Street adjacent to the existing Birch Street water tank. This additional sliver of land is needed to allow the town to build the new $3.15 million water tank while still using the old tank. This exchange requires approval from town meeting, the conservation commission, the selectmen acting as water commissioners, and the state legislature because it requires changing the use of conservation land. The swap provides access to a land-locked piece of conservation land off Franklin Street near Union Hall Road. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 21 seeks voter permission to allow selectmen to negotiate an easement to run 5,900 feet of water main across Earl Ricker's property on Mayflower Street. The purpose of the easement and water main is to connect the Evergreen water treatment plan into the new high pressure zone on the west side of Duxbury that will be created when the Birch Street water tank is built. The easement allows an alternative to the Water Department's initial plan of building a $400,000 30 ft by 30 ft pump station on Surrey Lane. The cost of the new water tank is addressed in the capital budget. Supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 22 is sponsored by the Board of Health and it requests voter authorization to enter Duxbury into an inter-municipal agreement with a coalition of other South Shore towns in order to provide public health services. The purpose is to be able to provide mutual aid to a town when it doesn't have the resources available to cope with a situation that requires public health action. It is similar to the mutual aid agreement among towns for fire protection. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 23 is a citizen's petition seeking to change the date of town elections from the fourth Saturday in March to the fourth Tuesday in March. Doug Carver of Lake Shore Drive is proposing this article in order to increase voter participation. Not supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 24 seeks to create two new streets: Hillside Lane and Amado Way. Amado Way is a subdivision road off Laurel Street and Hillside Lane is a subdivision road off North Street. This article is sponsored by the Planning Board and the Department of Public Works. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• ARTICLE 25 is known as the Mullen Rule and it asks voters to adopt a state law allowing a local board member a vote on an issue even if he/she has missed one public hearing. To qualify to vote, the board member must review all evidence of the missed hearing, such as tape recordings and written records, and provide proof that he did so. This rule affects committees that hold adjudicatory hearings, such as the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals, Selectmen, Board of Health, and Conservation Commission. It is sponsored by the Planning Board. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• ARTICLE 26 seeks to replace sheet 5 of the town's Zoning Map with an updated version that shows all town- and state-owned land, including Housing Authority properties. The official name of the page is the "Publicly Owned Lands Overlay District." This article is sponsored by the Planning Board. Supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 27 proposes revisions to the entire zoning map, updating the base map to reflect lots as they appear in the town's 2006 Geographic Information System (GIS) data. All sheets of the zoning map will show the GIS changes as well as any other minor revisions that have been discovered since the original revision of the map in 2004. The map totals seven pages. This is sponsored by the Planning Board. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• ARTICLE 28 proposes to change the zoning bylaw definition of building coverage and site coverage. It is sponsored by the Planning Board. In the building coverage section, the new bylaw would include accessory buildings, such as barns and garages, commercial buildings, and overhanging projections from any building in the calculation of how much land is covered by these structures. A projection could be a bay window, cornice or gutter. This article also amends the definition of site coverage by adding the wording "any materials," "any other impervious materials," and "equipment slabs" into the total calculation of a structure's site coverage. Town Planner Christine Stickney said this article was developed as a result of concerns from the Conservation, Planning, and Inspectional Services departments about inconsistencies in the definitions. Not supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 29 proposes a bylaw change for planned developments. Sponsored by the Planning Board, this change would require applicants to submit a preliminary qualification to the town if they are interested in creating a planned development. The current bylaw makes submitting a preliminary qualification optional not mandatory. This change would help the town work with an applicant during initial site design to address the complicated land use development issues of planned developments.

• ARTICLE 30 seeks a change to the demolition bylaw, Section 609.3 Demolition Delay Procedures. The Planning Board is sponsoring this article for the Historical Commission. This amendment would change the waiting period for issuing a demolition permit for a structure that comes under the demolition delay bylaw from six months to 12 months. Instituted in 1998, the demolition delay bylaw regulates buildings 75 years or older. In administering the demolition delay bylaw, the Historical Commission must use criteria in the bylaw to determine if a structure is historically significant enough to warrant a public hearing and notify the community of its intended demolition. If a structure is deemed significant, the Commission can declare a six-month delay in issuing the demolition permit in order to allow time for the structure to be saved. According to the Commission, a 12-month delay would give it more time to work with an owner to save a historical structure slated for demolition. It could also serve as a deterrent to tear-downs by new owners. The Historical Commission submitted the same article to town meeting last year. It failed by six votes. Not supported by selectmen, 1-2.

• ARTICLE 31 amends the zoning bylaw by altering the definition of the grade, or slope, of a piece of land. It works in tandem with Article 32, which seeks to change the definition of building height. Both articles are sponsored by the Zoning Board of Appeals and the Planning Board. The point of both is to try to control the height of new buildings so they are in scale to surrounding properties. In Article 31, a new definition of "natural grade" and "finish grade" of a property is created. "Natural grade" is defined as the measurement of the grade of the land before construction takes place on a property. "Finish grade" is the final grade of a piece of land after construction or site development. Article 31 would give the town planners measurements of a property's natural grade before the land is disturbed and a building constructed upon it. Not supported by board of selectmen. Supported by the finance committee.

• ARTICLE 32 proposes to change the definition of building height in the zoning bylaw by using the new definitions of "natural grade" and "finish grade" listed in Article 31. The new definition of "building height" measures the vertical distance of a structure from the "natural grade" or the "finish grade," whichever is less, and from a specific point on the roof depending on the type of roof, i.e., flat, gable, hip, or mansard, etc. It also amends the definition of "height" in a residential compatibility zoning district and in a neighborhood business zoning district. For example, in a residential compatibility district, a building may not be more than 35 feet high from the roof's ridge-line as measured from the average natural grade or from the average finish grade. Town Planner Christine Stickney has said the grade and height definition changes will help tighten up the bylaws and reduce ambiguity on how the height measurement is taken. Officials hope the new definitions will help new buildings blend in better with surrounding ones. Article 32 will still work if Article 31 doesn't pass. Not supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 33 seeks a change to the zoning bylaw in Section 404.20 Determination of Suitability of Residential Piers. The change allows the Conservation Commission to weigh in on the location of a pier, ensuring that the pier is constructed "over the shortest distance of salt marsh possible after considering the recommendation of the Conservation Commission." The article is sponsored by the Board of Appeals. Supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 34 is a citizen's petition to rezone one parcel of land at 414 Kingstown Way containing Bongi's Turkey Roost from residential to commercial for future expansion. Tom Pierce of Bongi's Turkey Roost seeks to rezone a parcel of land where his retail store is located from Residential Compatibility and Planned Development Zone 1 to Neighborhood Business Zone 1. Pierce said the new designation would take away the non-conforming use currently in existence and allow him to gain commercial financing to build a 1,000 ft addition off the back of the business, which was approved by the ZBA within the last few years. Bongi's, which sells turkeys for cooking and turkey products, has been operating in Duxbury since 1938. The article as written in the warrant seeks to rezone three parcels, but Pierce will amend that to only one parcel on town meeting floor. Supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 35 proposes a new shared-use path for pedestrians and bicyclists on the East side of Tremont Street/Route 3A from Chestnut Street to Depot Street. The Duxbury Sidewalk and Bike Path Committee has submitted the article in order to get a sense of the town about whether this is a good location for a new sidewalk.

The walking/bike path would be across the street from the town hall, cemetery and senior center. The half-mile path would use both private property and the state-right-of-way, which runs along the road. The Committee is seeking funding for the design through a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. The Committee has contacted all the abutters along the proposed route and, with the exception of the Duxbury Rural and Historical Society, all support the path. The Duxbury Rural and Historical Society will not allow the use of their property, Lapham Woods across from the cemetery and town hall, for the path. The path could still be built along the Society's woods but would have to be located in the state right-of-way closer to the road or would have to stop at Prior Farm Road. If town meeting voters approve the proposed path, then the committee will seek Community Preservation Act funds to construct it. Supported by board of selectmen.

• ARTICLE 36 requests up to $6,000 for a rapid notification telephone system. This article is sponsored by the Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee and the Duxbury Emergency Management Agency. The rapid notification system would be similar to the school department's ConnectED program. According to Nuclear Advisory Committee Chairwoman Mary Lampert, this system is needed because ConnectED cannot be expanded to include contact information for all residents and the Plymouth Country Sheriff's Department system cannot not guarantee the time when a Duxbury-specific message would be relayed. Supported by the finance committee. Supported by selectmen only if money comes from existing budgets, such as the emergency management agency or other town departments benefiting from the system.

• Article 37 asks for up to $2,000 for the purchase of hand operated gas tank pumps. This is also sponsored by the Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee. During an emergency evacuation, the potential for cars to run out of gas becomes a possibility. If electricity is also lost, hand pumps would facilitate filling up vehicles. The committee would like five pumps, one for each of Duxbury's four gas stations and one pump for the station that also provides diesel. The article is sponsored by the Department of Public Works, the Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee, and the Duxbury Emergency Management Agency. Supported by the finance committee. Selectmen support funding this article through grants.

• Article 38 seeks voters' support for a contention by Duxbury being heard by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission pertaining to the re-licensing process of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant in Plymouth. The Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee would like the public's backing in assuring that Pilgrim's owners take more effective methods to insure radioactively contaminated water is not leaking offsite into Cape Cod Bay. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 39 seeks voters' support for the Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee's second argument regarding the license renewal of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant in Plymouth. The Committee would like a public show of support for having Pilgrim create a "plume transport model" that reflects actual weather conditions. This would show what would actually happen under this area's real weather conditions if there was a nuclear leak at Pilgrim that sent a radioactive emission, or plume, into the air. The article also calls for Pilgrim to install "computerized combination real-time weather-radiation monitors" in appropriate locations off-site from the power plant. These would help make sure the protective actions taken during a nuclear emergency would be the appropriate ones. Supported by board of selectmen and finance committee.

• Article 40 will be indefinitely postponed. The Alternative Energy Committee had wanted $5,000 for software and consulting to allow the town to identify ways to reduce energy usage in town buildings. The funds would have allowed the Alternative Energy Committee to join an organization which has an energy management software that would help it base-line the town's current energy usage. The Committee also wanted to have some money on hand for minor consulting or legal work associated with any grant applications that they might pursue. However, since this money was not part of the FY08 budget, the committee chose to indefinitely postpone the request.

• Article 41 will probably be indefinitely postponed. It is an annual article that asks town meeting to add money from the town's free cash account to its savings account, the Stabilization Fund. This fund is the town's rainy day account, to be used for unforeseen circumstances. However, the town has dipped into it in past years and used the money to help balance the town's operating budget. Town Manager Richard MacDonald is not using any money from the Stabilization Fund for the operating budget this year. There will be no action on this article because there is no deposit available. This is the seventh consecutive year that no funds will be added to this account. The last deposit of $100,000 was made in 2000. Indefinite postponement supported by board of selectmen.

• Article 42 is a routine article that asks voters to allow the Board of Assessors to use free cash to reduce the tax levy. The specific amount of free cash used is determined at the very end of town meeting.