As part of her Girl Scout Gold Award project, Janine Neprud held two events this weekend, talking to students and Girl Scouts about the importance of equality and understanding.

On Saturday, Neprud met with Cadette troop 80810 at the Girl Scout House, where they discussed several topics under the umbrella of equality. First, they watched a two-minute clip of the film “Happy Feet,” when one of the penguins discovers he cannot sing like the other penguins and is teased for it. Neprud tied the clip into a discussion with the girls about how everyone is different and has different talents. The second activity was a discussion of current events. As sixth and seventh graders the girl scouts are very knowledgeable of different equality issues that have occurred in history or are occurring today.

“We talked about the various differences between peo- ple, such as race and religion,” Neprud said. “I was very impressed with the level of conversation we had.”

Since Neprud’s project is called EDEN (Everyone Deserves Equality Now), the third activity was to draw a picture of what each girl considered to be “paradise.” For some, paradise was a bakeshop, where there were endless baked goods. For another, paradise was a library, with bookshelves crawling up the walls. Many had a beach that was very similar to Dux- bury Beach.

“We talked about how people treat each other in these paradises and came to the consensus that people treat each other with kindness and respect,” Neprud said. “It’s interesting to see what their individual views of paradise are. I think the girls were able to open their minds during our discussion and think outside the box about what they can do to help promote equality.”

Troop leader Ann Marie DeWolf said she was impressed with Neprud and her ability to talk with the girls about equality and diversity in a way they could relate to.

Neprud also met with students at the First Church of Christ, Scientist, where she spoke with them about equal- ity and the importance of openness. Congregation Shirat Hayam of Marshfield brought its Sunday school program to the church and the group spent an hour learning about the two religions and shared stories and beliefs.

“It was very interesting to learn about everyone’s differ- ent beliefs,” Neprud said. “I think everyone came out of class that day realizing that although two different religious groups were present, those two groups weren’t so different at all.”